Course Notes: The Whole-Brain Child Approach. Pt 3

Our last Whole-Brain post covered the following topics:

  • Aside from the brain being divided into two hemispheres, it can also be split into the upstairs (reasoning) and the downstairs (emotions)
  • Strategies 3, 4, and 5 connect these two brains to reduce an “emotional hijack” and promote clear thinking

On to strategies 6 and 7. They’re short, we promise!

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Child(ish) Reads: Adventuring Together

Adventuring Together: How to Create Connections and Make Lasting Memories with Your Kids
By Greta Eskridge
224 pages.
Audiobook is 3 hrs and 54 mins.
This book is published by a Christian publisher; however, the content is not faith specific.
Chapters include personal stories as well as idea lists for kid adventures.

I first learned about Adventuring Together from the Minimalist Moms Podcast. It was three months into COVID and I was trying to rebuild my girls’ summer plans, which now no longer included our public park and splashpad. What could we do to make sure our toddlers weren’t spending the entire summer bored and indoors?

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Child(ish) Q&A: When will my kid be fun?

We’ve gotten this question quite a few times this past year, specifically from new dads who are unsure about what to do or how to play with their newborn.

To be honest, this is an interesting question to answer. For one, the definition of “fun” is completely subjective. Second, most “fun” activities we’re asked about depend on developmental skills that babies won’t acquire for months or even years. For example, you may not be able to toss your baby into the air safely until they develop good head and neck control (3 months). A child can’t properly throw a ball until they have appropriate trunk and shoulder stability (12-18 months), or catch a ball until they have appropriate hand-eye coordination, motor planning, and body/spatial awareness (2-3 years).  

Perhaps a better question is:
How can I share similar interests with my baby?

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Inside Out: How Memories are Made

When we think back on our childhood, a flood of picture reels can come into our heads. Some are warm and heartfelt, while others we prefer not to recall. All of those experiences shape who we become and, in many aspects, how we parent.

Although memory is an instinctive and complex function that involves various parts of the brain, we’re going to talk about episodic memory; memories that feel like you are reliving it as you recall it.

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